Cong Peng

/Economics & Big Data/

ABOUT

I am a PhD student in Economic Geography at London School of Economics, and a researcher in the project of Urbanisation in Developing Countries. Currently I have two strands of ongoing research. One looks at how different institutions affect the spatial structure in African cities and the implications of this for public service provision in urban areas based on satellite images. The other explores how innovations in transportation and e-commerce impact levels of air pollution and traffic congestion in Chinese cities.

EDUCATION

PhD in Economic Geography
London School of Economics


IN PROGRESS

Fox International Fellow
Yale University

SEP 2014 - JUN 2015

Master in Economics
Fudan University

SEP 2011 - JUN 2014

BA in Economics
Zhongnan University of Economics and Law

SEP 2007 - JUN 2011



WORKGING PAPERS

Colonial Legacies: Shaping African cities
with J. Vernon Henderson and Neeraj G. Baruah

Differential institutions imposed under colonial rule continue to affect the spatial structure of African cities and day-to-day life. Based on a sample of 318 cities across 28 countries with satellite data on built cover over time, Anglophone origin cities com- pared to Francophone ones are more sprawling and have less regular spatial layouts overall. They especially have more leapfrog development at the extensive margin. Re- sults are impervious to a border experiment and to many robustness tests, measures of sprawl, and sub-samples. Why would colonial origins matter? British colonial govern- ments operated under indirect rule and a dual mandate within cities, allowing colonial and native sections to develop without an overall plan and coordination. French gov- ernments operated more under direct rule, with, in principle, comprehensive integrated city planning and land allocation mechanisms. While the results provide evidence of the strong role of colonial influence and persistence of institutions, they also have pub- lic policy relevance. In cities, from DHS data, similar households which are located in areas of the city with more leapfrog development have poorer connections to piped water, electricity, and landlines, presumably because of higher costs of providing in- frastructure with urban sprawl.

Nov 2015 - CURRENT



RESEARCH POSITIONS

Center for Economic Performance, LSE
Research Assitant

Nov 2015 - CURRENT

Yale Law School
Research Assistant

Dec 2014 - Sep 2015

China Knowledge Center, McKinsey & Company
Research Assistant

Sep 2012 - Mar 2014


Teaching

Geographic Information System Workshop, LSE
Instructor
Workshop material download here

2016, 2017, 2018

Techniques of Spatial Economic Analysis, LSE
Teaching assitant

2018

Introductory to Quantitative Analysis, LSE
Teaching assitant

2017


SKILLS

Python


ArcGIS


Stata


R


Web development


LaTex





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CONTACT

Email
c.peng7@lse.ac.uk

Adress
Houghton Street
WC2A 2AE
London, England.

Phone
+44 7743 450595

SOCIAL LINKS